IFA Congresses

Resonant Voice as a Potential Fluency Technique: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

Kristin M. PELCZARSKI1 and Linda HOAG2

Kansas State University 1This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.2This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Abstract. This pilot study explored the effectiveness of using resonant voice therapy as a technique to reduce overt characteristics of stuttered speech in adults who stutter (AWS). Upon completion of an 6-week training program, participants were observed to stutter less frequently and reported a perceived reduction in frequency, tension, and duration of stuttered speech. AWS also reported natural-sounding speech when using resonant voice. Despite the perceived fluency benefits, AWS expressed an unwillingness to use the technique after the therapy program was complete. A qualitative analysis of participant comments was completed to further understand what treatment factors are most important to AWS.

Read more: Resonant Voice as a Potential Fluency Technique: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

The Source of Stuttering Disclosure, and its Effects on Attitudes Toward Pediatric Stuttering 

Greg SNYDER and Molly Grace WILLIAMS

The University of Mississippi, University, MS, USA

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Abstract.  While research reveals benefits of stuttering disclosure in adults, there is far less data documenting the effects of pediatric stuttering self-disclosure, or the effects of stuttering disclosure by third-party advocates.  The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of stuttering disclosure relative to the perceptions of a child who stutters, particularly when the source of stuttering disclosure is from the child who stutters or adults serving as child advocates.  This study measures the perception of speech skills and personality characteristics of a 12-year-old boy who stutters as a function of the source of stuttering disclosure.  Sources of stuttering disclosure conditions included a: non-disclosure control condition, child self-disclosure, “parent” disclosure, and “teacher” disclosure experimental conditions.  Initial results support the documented benefits of stuttering disclosure when provided by the child who stutters, and also his “teacher”.  Stuttering disclosure from the “mother” generally provided no substantial benefit relative to the perceived speech skills or personality characteristics of the 12-year-old boy who stutters.

Read more: The Source of Stuttering Disclosure, and its Effects on Attitudes Toward Pediatric Stuttering 

The Effects of Acetaminophen on Emotional Pain and Stuttering Desensitization

Greg SNYDER and Meliah GRANT
The University of Mississippi, University, MS, USA

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Abstract.  Persistent stuttering has been documented as being generally resistant to behavioral treatment and prone to relapse, and is often associated with increased levels of anxiety.  Similarly, listeners have been documented to react negatively to stuttering, and are also documented as having unfounded negative stereotypes against those who stutter, potentially resulting in a decreased quality of life for those who stutter.  Accordingly, desensitization is a popular stuttering therapy technique that aims to improve quality of life, as well as improve stuttering management skills.  Additionally, the fluent listening population can also benefit from desensitization by reducing negative reactions to stuttering or people who stutter.  Recent studies have documented that an over-the-counter pain medication, acetaminophen (i.e., paracetamol), can reduce social/emotional discomfort and anxiety in addition to physical discomfort.  The purpose of this study is to measure the effects of acetaminophen on changes of perceived personality characteristics of people who stutter after exposure to stuttering.  Specifically, this study measures the effects of acetaminophen on changes in the emotional state of fluent participants as measured by the: (a) Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), (b) the Brief Mood Introspection Scale (BMIS), and (c) perceived personality characteristics of a PWS as a function of exposure to severe overt stuttering.  Analysis of the pilot data suggests that acetaminophen may be significant in affecting the emotional state of participants after exposure to stuttering, as well as participants’ perceptions of people who stutter.  As a result, acetaminophen may have a number of potential clinical applications in the treatment of stuttering, as well as benefit fluent listeners or professionals eager to advance their own stuttering desensitization. 

Read more: The Effects of Acetaminophen on Emotional Pain and Stuttering Desensitization

Coping with stuttering using Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT): Updates from India

Pallavi KELKAR1

1School of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, BharatiVidyapeeth (Deemed University)

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Abstract. “Positive change” for persons with stuttering is a complex variable composed of reduction in stuttering severity as well as improvement in attitudes, participation and quality of life. This paper describes how the use of Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT) along with speech therapy for stuttering can bring about holistic positive outcomes. Its use in individual and group therapy for children and adults has been discussed, with activities under each category. Case studies of persons who benefitted from this approach have been outlined against the backdrop of the sociocultural scenario in India.

Read more: Coping with stuttering using Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT): Updates from India

Experiences and Insights from Private Practice SLPs

Kate BRIDGMAN1 and Shane ERICKSON1

1La Trobe University, Australia

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Abstract. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in private practice are required to translate clinical trial treatment protocols to implement evidence-based practice. Many Australian paediatric private practices are generalist clinics rather than specialist fluency clinics and SLPs working in this context have varying levels of training, skills and experience working with children who stutter. While most participants in this study reported using the evidence-based Lidcombe Program, almost a third were not formally trained to do so and their practices, perceptions and confidence to deliver this treatment varied considerably. Barriers and facilitators of treatment success are explored and suggestions for future translational research with this clinical population are presented.

Read more: Experiences and Insights from Private Practice SLPs

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
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non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

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