IFA Congresses

Normal Rates and Disfluencies in French And English

Normal Rates and Disfluencies in French And English

Patricia M. Roberts1 and Ann Meltzer2
1Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON KII-I 8M5 Canada
2Stuttering Treatment Clinic, The Rehabilitation Centre, 505 Smyth Road, Ottawa, On. K1H 8M2,

SUMMARY

Most published studies of normal speech disfluencies and rate of speech have reported on English speakers. To adequately serve non-English speaking people who stutter, we -need data on other languages. This paper examines speaking rate and normal speech disfluencies in unilingual English-speaking adults and French-speaking adults during a monologue task. The rate of speech for English and French speakers was similar but the mean number of disfluencies per 100 syllables in the French group was double that of the English group. English norms for normal disfluencies in non-stuttering adults should not be applied to French (Canadian) speech.

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Perceptions of African-American Middle and High School Students About Stuttering

Perceptions of African-American Middle and High School Students About Stuttering

Susan Roesti1, Glen Tellis1, and Rodney Gable2
1Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Special Education, 259 Davis Hall, Indiana, PA I 5 705
2Bowling Green State University, 242 Health Centetg Dept of Communication Disorders, Bowling Green, OH, 43402

SUMMARY

The Stuttering Inventory for African-American Students was administered to 168 African-American middle and high school students to determine their perceptions about stuttering. Results indicate that the scale is a reliable and valid instrument. The 25-item, three-factor scale adequately examines concepts that relate to perceptions, causes of, cures for, reactions to stuttering, and social perceptions about stuttering. Results also indicate that females are more likely than males to disagree about the causes of, cures for, and reactions to stuttering and that the race of the therapist is not important when treating persons who stutter. Implications for assessment and treatment are discussed.

Read more: Perceptions of African-American Middle and High School Students About Stuttering

The Influence of Syntactic Variables on the Development of Stuttering

The Influence of Syntactic Variables on the Development of Stuttering

Dieter Rommel
University of Ulm, Section of Phorziatrics, Schillerstr. 15, 89077 Ulm, Germany

SUMMARY

The influence of selected psycholinguistic variables on the further course of childhood stuttering is presented and discussed by examining the study population from t0 (first contact, N=71) to t9 (4;6 years later). The stuttering children and their mothers were videotaped in 6 month-intervals in a play situation. The transcribed utterances of the children were analyzed with a sophisticated computer-based language profiling system. The results confirm the research data obtained up to date, stating that stuttering occurs more frequently with grammatically more complex and longer sentences. Results suggest that some syntactic variables are important with respect to the course of stuttering.

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Comparison of Exchange Patterns of Stuttering In Spanish and English Monolingual Speakers and a Bilingual Spanish-English Speaker

Comparison of Exchange Patterns of Stuttering In Spanish and English Monolingual Speakers and a Bilingual Spanish-English Speaker

P. Howell, L. Ruffle, A. Fernandez-Zuniga, R. Gutierrez, A.H. Fernandez, M.L. O’Brien, M. Tarasco, I. Vallejo Gomez & J. Au-Yeung
University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H OAP

SUMMARY

Samples of the spontaneous speech of monolingual Spanish speakers who stutter of different ages and a Spanish-English bilingual speaker who stutters were analyzed. The patterns of stuttering in these samples were examined to establish how they compare to those reported to occur for English. The characteristics examined for the monolingual speakers were the difference in stuttering rate on function and content words over ages (Howell, Au-Yeung & Sackin’s 1999 exchange relations). Young Spanish speakers showed a higher rate of function than content words whereas older speakers showed less of a difference (as reported previously for English). Stuttering rates on function and content words in the two languages of a bilingual speaker were examined. The speaker showed a more adult-like pattern in his dominant language (Spanish) but a more child- like pattern in his second language (English). The results are discussed in terms of the implications for theory, diagnosis and treatment of the disorder.

Read more: Comparison of Exchange Patterns of Stuttering In Spanish and English Monolingual Speakers and a...

Judgments of Disfluency in a Familiar vs. an Unfamiliar Language

Judgments of Disfluency in a Familiar vs. an Unfamiliar Language

Brian D. Humphrey
Programs in Speech, Language, and Communication Disorders, Nova Southeastern University, 3301 College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314, USA

SUMMARY

This study examined whether bilingual English-Spanish speaking judges may be better at making disfluency judgments in Spanish than monolingual English-speaking judges. Both groups judged a Spanish-language narrative to contain a greater percentage of disfluencies than an English-language narrative by the same speaker. However, neither group identified a significantly greater percentage of disfluencies in the Spanish-language narrative. Implications for treatment and directions for further research are discussed.

Read more: Judgments of Disfluency in a Familiar vs. an Unfamiliar Language

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
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The official journal of the International Fluency Association
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