IFA Congresses

The Effects of Emotional Intelligence Training in Fluency Disorders Classes

The Effects of Emotional Intelligence Training in Fluency Disorders Classes

Isabella K. Reichel1 and Kenneth O. St. Louis2
1Long Island University, Fluency Renaissance Center, University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA, Nova Southeastern University, 330] College Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314, USA
2Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, PO Box 6122, Morgantown, WV26506-6]22, USA

SUMMARY

Success of stuttering intervention may be compromised by speech-language pathologists’ negative stereotypes toward people who stutter. This study investigated the effect of emotional intelligence (El) training on attitudes of graduate students in fluency disorders courses in one New York City university, compared to attitudes of a control group at another New York City university without such training. An EI scale, a survey of attitudes toward stuttering, a bipolar adjective scale, and responses to an open-ended questionnaire regarding El training indicated modest expected changes in quantitative measures and very positive impressions regarding the value of El concepts in stuttering intervention.

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What Has Become of Communication When Someone Stutters and What Can Be Done to Change That Communication?

What Has Become of Communication When Someone Stutters and What Can Be Done to Change That Communication?

Anne Marie Simon
Chargee de cours sur le begaiemenr a Paris VI
Ex-Attachee au Lahoratoire Pathologies du Langage INSERM Hopital de la Salpetriere 75013 Paris
4 rue Cecile Vallet 92 340 Bourg la Reine France

SUMMARY

Many behaviours are altered when patients are in a situation of stuttering. Overcoming stuttering depends as much on the control of fluency and the modification of stuttering as on the inner building of a “ being able to communicate”. Building a link between his or her inner world and the inner world of the other speaker is the central therapeutic task for the stutterer. The means of such a change will be described here.

Read more: What Has Become of Communication When Someone Stutters and What Can Be Done to Change That...

Public Attitudes Toward Stuttering and Other Human Attributes in Brazil

Public Attitudes Toward Stuttering and Other Human Attributes in Brazil

Kenneth O. St. Louis1 and Claudia Regina F Urquim De Andrade2
1Department Of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, PO Box 6122, Morgantown, WV26506-6I22, USA
2Department of Physiotherapy, Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences and Occupational Therapy, Sao Paulo University, Sao Paulo, Brazil

SUMMARY

As part of the International Project on Attitudes Toward Stuttering (IPATS), 188 questionnaires were analyzed from university students and other adults living in Brazil from the state and city of S510 Paulo and from Minas Gerais, an adjacent state. The questionnaires were Brazilian Portuguese translations of a slightly modified version of the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-EXperimental Edition (POSHA-E) (St. Louis, et al., 2001). The two states differed significantly on some questionnaire items, although the overall sample was similar to previous research using the POSHA-E in English and other languages.

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Two Very Different Cases of Adult Onset Stuttering

Two Very Different Cases of Adult Onset Stuttering

Jill Harrison
McGill University Health Centre, 1650 CedarAvenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4

SUMMARY

Two cases of adult onset stuttering are_ presented, one of neurological origin, one functional. Neither had any history of stuttering behaviour nor any other speech or language abnormality prior to onset of dysfluency at ages 28 and 42 respectively. LF presented with an atypical pattern of multiple syllable and word repetitions following a stroke. TN presented with a severe stutter which had gradually developed over a period of weeks. Neurological findings, stuttering behaviours, and response to treatment will be compared and contrasted. Implications for" the nature and development of stuttering will be discussed.

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Diagnostic Criteria Of Determination Of Cluttering In School Children

Diagnostic Criteria Of Determination Of Cluttering In School Children

Yulia 0. Filat Ova, Lidia I. Beliakova
Logopedia Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 38-3-406, Akademika Anohina St., Moscow 119602, Russia

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study is to determine the diagnostic criteria of cluttering. We have tested 55 subjects between eight and sixteen years of age. We used adapted and modified Daly’s Checklist for Possible Cluttering. The test results have allowed us to divide the children into four groups: pure stuttering, a mixed form with a prevalence of stuttering, a mixed form with a prevalence of cluttering, and pure cluttering. The subjects with pure cluttering and the ones with the mixed form where cluttering dominated were studied more carefully. The results include characteristics of their oral speech, serial organisation of movements and sense of rhythm, intellectual processes and attention.

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
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non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

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